Why do black men feel the need to not express their emotions? This has been an age-old debate over black men & their emotions and how it’s somehow linked to the stripping of manhood during the enslavement era. However, we are in 2012. The apparent suicide of OJ Murdock (a NFL player) shocked the people around him. No one knew he was depressed or had any problems in his life. It made me think, why didn’t he just TELL someone he was depressed or having issues? What’s so taboo about that? Was he worried about not seeming in control of his emotions? According to CNN, he was riding the bench for a while and they seem to imply that this was the maybe one of things bothering him. You know, one time, it took this guy a year and a half to tell me he loved me after I had pretty much kinda known it all along. But he refused to show it, admit it, whatever. I had another ex-boyfriend who was on the verge of depression after he had kids and I didn’t want to be with him anymore. So my question remains, when will the brothers start showing some EMOTION…?

Why do black men feel the need to not express their emotions? This has been an age-old debate over black men & their emotions and how it’s somehow linked to the stripping of manhood during the enslavement era. However, we are in 2012. The apparent suicide of OJ Murdock (a NFL player) shocked the people around him. No one knew he was depressed or had any problems in his life. It made me think, why didn’t he just TELL someone he was depressed or having issues? What’s so taboo about that? Was he worried about not seeming in control of his emotions? According to CNN, he was riding the bench for a while and they seem to imply that this was the maybe one of things bothering him. You know, one time, it took this guy a year and a half to tell me he loved me after I had pretty much kinda known it all along. But he refused to show it, admit it, whatever. I had another ex-boyfriend who was on the verge of depression after he had kids and I didn’t want to be with him anymore. So my question remains, when will the brothers start showing some EMOTION…?

kemetically-afrolatino:

Some books in my library (read most of these) Gotta have Diop, chu alredy shkno

kemetically-afrolatino:

Some books in my library (read most of these) Gotta have Diop, chu alredy shkno

(Source: revolutionary-afrolatino)

"Black Studies: 'Swaggering Into the Future' A new generation of Ph.D.'s advances the discipline"

“The older generation created space for us, but our work is more nuanced,” Ms. Fraser says. “Our mentors who didn’t come out of African-American studies departments were constricted by traditional discourses where there was no interdisciplinary approach. This generation is setting the model for interdisciplinary approaches in the humanities in general, and black studies continues to force traditional disciplines to address silences and to look at how race is constructed.”

(Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Black Women and Marriage

Read this article today (check thegrio.com) about black women and marriage. All the while through undergrad and to the day I graduated I wondered if I was sentencing myself to a life a singlehood. What do black men, or any men for that matter, perceive of black women with degrees? Do they think we are too aggressive or won’t have anything to converse about? I like discussing ratchetness sometimes! I’m just saying. Haha. But seriously, all the black women in higher education as far as I can remember were SINGLE. With the exception of a few. But were they single by choice or by no fault of their own…? I wonder. 

Love!

Love!

(via notevenoneperson)

The Beginning.

As a recent graduate with a degree in English and Africana Studies I struggled to find some sort of meeting ground for the two disciplines. What came as a result was a passion for writing my thoughts, opinions, and analyses of current events pertaining to Black culture and politics. After graduating I found myself more conscious of the events that affected my community as well as thinking of ways to solve issues that plague our community. A very important stepping stone to solving those issues includes knowing in-depth history of Blacks as a people. As I make my way through my Masters program in African-American Studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta, I invite any and all who are interested in what I have to say… I don’t have all the answers or solutions, but I can contribute to the dialogue.